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Fedora People

Infra and RelEng Update – Week 29 2024

Posted by Fedora Community Blog on 2024-07-19 10:00:00 UTC

This is a weekly report from the I&R (Infrastructure & Release Engineering) Team. It also contains updates for CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team as the CPE initiatives are in most cases tied to I&R work.

We provide you both an infographic and text version of the weekly report. If you just want to quickly look at what we did, just look at the infographic. If you are interested in more in-depth details look below the infographic.

Week: July 15-19, 2024

I&R infographic

Infrastructure & Release Engineering

The purpose of this team is to take care of day to day business regarding CentOS and Fedora Infrastructure and Fedora release engineering work.
It’s responsible for services running in Fedora and CentOS infrastructure and preparing things for the new Fedora release (mirrors, mass branching, new namespaces, etc.).
List of planned/in-progress issues

Fedora Infra

CentOS Infra including CentOS CI

Release Engineering

CPE Initiatives

EPEL

Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (or EPEL) is a Fedora Special Interest Group that creates, maintains, and manages a high-quality set of additional packages for Enterprise Linux, including, but not limited to, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), CentOS, Scientific Linux (SL) and Oracle Linux (OL).

Updates

Community Design

CPE has a few members who are working as part of the Community Design Team. This team is working on anything related to design in the Fedora Community.

Updates

  • Podman: Improving consistency across all pages 📃
  • CoreOS 5th anniversary designs
  • Swag designs for Flock 🐤o
  • last day to vote for F42 inspo on Fedora discussions

ARC Investigations

The ARC (which is a subset of the CPE team) investigates possible initiatives that CPE might take on.

Updates

  • Git Forge Investigation
    • Akashdeep Dhar has provided the recap on Git Forge Investigation so far to Ryan Lerch on a 1:1 meeting call
    • Akashdeep Dhar plans to get started with investigating the self-hosted GitLab deployment on the user stories
    • Akashdeep Dhar has provided service accounts to Tomas Hrcka, Kevin Fenzi, and Ryan Lerch 
    • Ryan Lerch wants to work on investigating GitLab on the user stories provided using the service account
    • Tomas Hrcka will be meeting with the Fedora Governance team
      • Share the inability to share the final comparison until Flock
      • Open up INVITE-ONLY deployments for  GitLab and Forgejo during Flock
    • Michal Konecny is looking into deploying Forgejo at his end 
    • Tomas Hrcka plans on opening the meetings up to the open community
      • Especially for testing the user stories with the provided deployment for GitLab and Forgejo made by us on OpenShift
    • David Kirwan and Lenka Segura joined the ARC investigation efforts with helping with the OpenShift deployments of GitLab and Forgejo
    • This limited access and INVITE-ONLY deployment would be made available to community members to help with user stories

If you have any questions or feedback, please respond to this report or contact us on #redhat-cpe channel on matrix.

The post Infra and RelEng Update – Week 29 2024 appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

PHP version 8.2.22RC1 and 8.3.10RC1

Posted by Remi Collet on 2024-07-19 05:54:00 UTC

Release Candidate versions are available in the testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS / Alma / Rocky and other clones) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, the perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

RPMs of PHP version 8.3.10RC1 are available

  • as base packages in the remi-modular-test for Fedora 38-40 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 8
  • as SCL in remi-test repository

RPMs of PHP version 8.2.20RC1 are available

  • as base packages in the remi-modular-test for Fedora 38-40 and Enterprise Linux ≥ 8
  • as SCL in remi-test repository

emblem-notice-24.png The packages are available for x86_64 and aarch64.

emblem-notice-24.pngPHP version 8.1 is now in security mode only, so no more RC will be released.

emblem-notice-24.pngInstallation: follow the wizard instructions.

emblem-notice-24.png Announcements:

Parallel installation of version 8.3 as Software Collection:

yum --enablerepo=remi-test install php83

Parallel installation of version 8.2 as Software Collection:

yum --enablerepo=remi-test install php82

Update of system version 8.3:

dnf module switch-to php:remi-8.3
dnf --enablerepo=remi-modular-test update php\*

Update of system version 8.2:

dnf module switch-to php:remi-8.2
dnf --enablerepo=remi-modular-test update php\*

emblem-notice-24.png Notice:

  • version 8.3.10RC1 is also in Fedora rawhide for QA
  • version 8.4.0alpha2 is also available in the repository
  • EL-9 packages are built using RHEL-9.4
  • EL-8 packages are built using RHEL-8.10
  • EL-7 packages are built using RHEL-7.9
  • oci8 extension uses the RPM of the Oracle Instant Client version 23.4 on x86_64 or 19.23 on aarch64
  • intl extension uses libicu 73.2
  • RC version is usually the same as the final version (no change accepted after RC, exception for security fix).
  • versions 8.2.22 and 8.3.10 are planed for August 1st, in 2 weeks.

Software Collections (php82, php83)

Base packages (php)

First Summits on the Air (SOTA) Activation in Malaysia

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-19 01:03:15 UTC

9M6/KB-001 Mt.Kinabalu
03.Jun.2023
東マレーシアのキナバル山 Low’s Peak(4095.2m)に登拝し趣味の無線運用。
その内容をFB Newsの記事に取り上げていただきました。
https://www.fbnews.jp/202306/sota/

I have climbed and activated on Low’s Peak(4095.2m),
the summit of Mt.Kinabalu = SOTA:9M6/KB-001 with Ito(JA7ENA), Ted(JL1SDA) and Tak(7M4QZE).
Low’s Peak is the highest in Malaysia, once thought to be the highest in Southeast Asia.
I believe this is the 1st SOTA activation in Malaysia.

Tnx ALL.
73,
de JG0AWE/ WAKA

The post First Summits on the Air (SOTA) Activation in Malaysia appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Illuminate Your Adventures: The Convoy T3 Golden AA/14500 Flashlight

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 13:17:31 UTC

The Convoy T3 Golden AA/14500 flashlight, available at ConvoyLight.com, is a remarkable blend of compact design and powerful illumination. Crafted for those who demand reliability and versatility in their everyday carry (EDC) tools, the T3 flashlight stands out with its impressive features and robust build.

A Perfect Blend of Performance and Portability

The T3 flashlight is designed to be your reliable companion, whether you’re navigating the great outdoors or tackling everyday tasks. Its compact size, measuring just 93.3mm in length and weighing 47g (excluding the clip and lanyard), makes it an ideal addition to your EDC kit. Despite its small stature, this flashlight packs a powerful punch with its high-performance LED options, including XPG2 R70, 219B R9080, 219C R9050, and 519A R9080, delivering a flux range of 300-500 lumens.

Versatile Power Options

One of the standout features of the Convoy T3 is its compatibility with both AA and 14500 lithium batteries. This flexibility ensures that you can easily find replacement batteries in any situation, making it a dependable tool for emergencies. When powered by a 1.5V AA battery, the flashlight can output a maximum current of 0.5A. Switching to a 4.2V 14500 lithium battery boosts the output to an impressive 1.5A, providing a significant increase in brightness and performance.

Intelligent Design and User-Friendly Interface

The T3 flashlight is equipped with a tail switch that allows for easy operation, including full clicks to power on and off and half-presses to cycle through modes. The flashlight offers a range of modes to suit various needs, including four standard modes (1%, 10%, 35%, and 100%) and a configurable 12-group mode system. This flexibility ensures that you can customize the light output to match any situation, from discreet close-up work to high-intensity illumination.

Advanced Features for Enhanced Usability

The Convoy T3 flashlight is designed with several advanced features that enhance its usability and reliability:

  1. Battery Judgement Function: The flashlight intelligently detects the battery voltage, distinguishing between AA and 14500 batteries, ensuring optimal performance.
  2. Low Voltage Protection: When using a 4.2V battery, the flashlight provides a warning by flashing three times slowly when the voltage drops below 3V and shuts down automatically at 2.8V to prevent battery damage. This feature is not available when using a 1.5V battery.
  3. Battery Check Mode: The flashlight includes a battery check mode that flashes to indicate the battery voltage, allowing you to monitor power levels easily.
  4. Waterproof and Durable: With an IPX6 waterproof rating, the T3 flashlight is built to withstand harsh weather conditions, making it perfect for outdoor adventures.

Premium Build Quality

Constructed from high-quality aluminum alloy, the Convoy T3 flashlight is designed to endure the rigors of daily use. The orange peel reflector and normal glass lens ensure a smooth and focused beam, while the included clip and lanyard offer versatile carrying options.

Ideal for Diverse Applications

Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a professional requiring a reliable tool, or someone who values the convenience of a powerful flashlight in their everyday carry, the Convoy T3 Golden AA/14500 flashlight is an excellent choice. Its compact size, powerful output, and intelligent features make it a versatile and dependable lighting solution for a wide range of applications.

Conclusion

The Convoy T3 Golden AA/14500 flashlight represents the pinnacle of portable lighting technology. Its blend of compact design, powerful performance, and user-friendly features make it an indispensable tool for anyone seeking reliable illumination. Visit ConvoyLight.com to learn more about this exceptional flashlight and to add it to your EDC collection. Illuminate your path with the Convoy T3 and experience the difference that quality and performance can make.

The post Illuminate Your Adventures: The Convoy T3 Golden AA/14500 Flashlight appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

The Ultimate Everyday Carry: Convoy T5 Flashlight AA/14500

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 13:07:29 UTC

In the world of flashlights, the Convoy T5 stands out as a reliable and versatile option for everyday carry (EDC). This compact yet powerful flashlight offers a perfect blend of functionality, durability, and convenience. In this detailed blog post, we’ll explore the unique features and benefits of the Black Convoy T5 flashlight, making it an essential tool for a wide range of applications.

Compact Yet Powerful

The Convoy T5 is designed to be compact without compromising on performance. With a maximum output of 500 lumens, this flashlight delivers impressive brightness for its size. Whether you’re using it for daily tasks, outdoor adventures, or emergency situations, the T5 provides ample light to see clearly in the dark.

Versatile Power Options

One of the standout features of the Convoy T5 is its versatility in power options. It is compatible with both AA and 14500 batteries, giving you the flexibility to choose the power source that best suits your needs. Using a 14500 battery maximizes the flashlight’s brightness and runtime, while an AA battery offers a more readily available and cost-effective option.

Durable and Weather-Resistant

Constructed from high-quality materials, the Convoy T5 is built to withstand the rigors of everyday use. Its robust aluminum alloy body is both impact-resistant and waterproof, with an IPX8 rating. This durability ensures that the T5 can handle drops, bumps, and exposure to water, making it a reliable companion in various environments.

User-Friendly Design

The Convoy T5 is designed with user convenience in mind. Its compact size and lightweight construction make it easy to carry in your pocket, bag, or on a keychain. The flashlight features a simple interface with a tail switch for easy operation. You can quickly switch between different brightness levels and modes to suit your needs.

Multiple Lighting Modes

To accommodate different lighting requirements, the Convoy T5 offers multiple lighting modes:

  • High Mode: 500 lumens for maximum brightness.
  • Medium Mode: 200 lumens for balanced light output and extended runtime.
  • Low Mode: 50 lumens for tasks that require less light and longer battery life.
  • Strobe Mode: For emergency signaling and self-defense.

These modes provide versatility, allowing you to adjust the brightness and power consumption based on the situation.

Efficient Heat Dissipation

The Convoy T5 features efficient heat dissipation mechanisms to ensure optimal performance. Its design includes thermal management to prevent overheating, allowing the flashlight to maintain consistent brightness without compromising safety or functionality. This feature is especially important during prolonged use or when operating at high brightness levels.

Practical Applications

The Convoy T5 is suitable for a wide range of applications:

  • Everyday Carry: Its compact size and powerful performance make it perfect for daily use, whether you need a light source for finding items in dark spaces, navigating at night, or handling unexpected situations.
  • Outdoor Activities: For hikers, campers, and adventurers, the T5 provides reliable illumination for nighttime activities, enhancing safety and visibility.
  • Emergency Preparedness: In emergencies, having a dependable flashlight is crucial. The T5’s multiple modes and durable construction ensure you have a reliable light source when you need it most.

Technical Specifications

Here are some key technical details of the Convoy T5 flashlight:

  • LED: High-efficiency LED
  • Maximum Brightness: 500 lumens
  • Battery Compatibility: AA and 14500 batteries
  • Material: Aluminum alloy
  • Waterproof: IPX8 rating
  • Impact Resistance: High durability
  • Size: Compact and lightweight for easy carrying
  • Lighting Modes: High, Medium, Low, Strobe

Conclusion

The Convoy T5 flashlight is a versatile, reliable, and powerful tool designed for everyday carry and a variety of other applications. Its impressive brightness, multiple power options, and durable construction make it an excellent choice for anyone in need of a dependable light source. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a professional, or someone who values high-quality EDC gear, the T5 is a flashlight that will not disappoint.

For more details and to purchase, visit the official product page.

The post The Ultimate Everyday Carry: Convoy T5 Flashlight AA/14500 appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Illuminate Your Adventures with the Sofirn HS41 4000 Lumen Headlamp

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 13:00:58 UTC

When it comes to high-performance lighting for outdoor enthusiasts and professionals, the Sofirn HS41 4000 Lumen Headlamp sets a new standard. This headlamp combines incredible brightness, durability, and versatility, making it an essential tool for anyone needing reliable illumination in challenging conditions. In this comprehensive blog post, we’ll explore the standout features, benefits, and practical applications of the Sofirn HS41.

Unrivaled Brightness and Performance

At the heart of the Sofirn HS41 is a powerful array of four high-performance LEDs that deliver a staggering 4000 lumens of brightness. This headlamp provides an exceptional beam distance, ensuring you can clearly see your surroundings in the darkest environments. Whether you’re hiking, camping, or conducting a night-time search, the HS41 provides the visibility you need to stay safe and efficient.

Versatile Lighting Modes

The HS41 offers multiple lighting modes to suit different needs. With options for turbo, high, medium, low, and moonlight modes, you can easily adjust the brightness to match your specific requirements. The headlamp also features a strobe mode for emergency signaling and self-defense. This versatility makes the HS41 an invaluable tool for a wide range of activities, from outdoor adventures to professional tasks.

Rechargeable and Long-Lasting

Equipped with a high-capacity rechargeable battery, the Sofirn HS41 ensures extended use without the need for frequent recharges. The headlamp features a convenient USB Type-C charging port, allowing for quick and easy recharging from various devices. With impressive battery life, the HS41 can provide up to 80 hours of light on its lowest setting, ensuring you have reliable illumination whenever you need it.

Durable and Weather-Resistant

Built to withstand the harshest conditions, the HS41 is constructed from high-quality materials that ensure durability and longevity. The headlamp is both impact-resistant and waterproof, with an IPX8 rating, meaning it can be submerged in water up to 2 meters deep. This rugged construction makes the HS41 ideal for outdoor activities, professional use, and emergency situations where reliability is crucial.

Comfortable and Adjustable

Designed with user comfort in mind, the Sofirn HS41 features an adjustable headband that ensures a secure and comfortable fit. The lightweight design reduces strain during extended use, while the adjustable angle allows you to direct the light exactly where you need it. This makes the HS41 perfect for tasks that require hands-free illumination, such as climbing, fishing, and home repairs.

Practical Applications of the Sofirn HS41

The versatility and power of the HS41 make it suitable for a wide range of applications:

Outdoor Adventures

For hikers, campers, and outdoor enthusiasts, the HS41 provides reliable illumination for night-time activities. Its powerful beam can light up trails, campsites, and surroundings, ensuring safety and visibility in the dark.

Professional Use

Professionals such as search and rescue teams, construction workers, and utility workers will appreciate the durability and brightness of the HS41. Its multiple lighting modes and long battery life make it suitable for demanding tasks that require reliable light.

Emergency Situations

In emergencies, having a dependable light source is crucial. The HS41’s high brightness and long runtime ensure you have the illumination you need during power outages, natural disasters, and other emergencies. The strobe mode adds an extra layer of safety for signaling and self-defense.

Technical Specifications

Here are some key technical details of the Sofirn HS41:

  • LEDs: 4 high-performance LEDs
  • Brightness: Up to 4000 lumens
  • Lighting Modes: Turbo, High, Medium, Low, Moonlight, Strobe
  • Battery: High-capacity rechargeable battery
  • Charging: USB Type-C
  • Waterproof: IPX8 rating
  • Impact Resistance: Yes
  • Beam Distance: Extensive range
  • Runtime: Up to 80 hours on lowest setting
  • Weight: Lightweight for comfort

Conclusion

The Sofirn HS41 4000 Lumen Headlamp is a powerful and versatile lighting solution that excels in performance, durability, and convenience. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a professional requiring a reliable light source, or someone preparing for emergencies, the HS41 is a headlamp that will not disappoint. With its exceptional brightness, multiple lighting modes, and rugged construction, this headlamp is designed to meet and exceed your expectations.

For more details and to purchase, visit the official product page.

The post Illuminate Your Adventures with the Sofirn HS41 4000 Lumen Headlamp appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Discover the Power and Portability of the Sofirn Mini SC13 EDC Flashlight

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 12:52:39 UTC

When it comes to everyday carry (EDC) essentials, a reliable flashlight is a must-have. The Sofirn Mini SC13 stands out in the crowded market of EDC flashlights by combining power, convenience, and durability in a compact form. This flashlight is designed for those who need a dependable light source that is easy to carry and versatile enough for various applications.

Exceptional Brightness in a Compact Size

The Sofirn Mini SC13 packs an impressive 1300 lumens of brightness into a body that measures just 2.54 inches in length and weighs only 1.41 ounces. This level of brightness, powered by a single SST40 LED, is remarkable for a flashlight of its size, making it an excellent choice for both everyday use and emergency situations. The SC13 can illuminate objects up to 217 meters away, providing you with the visibility you need in the darkest conditions.

Convenient USB Type-C Rechargeable

Gone are the days of fumbling with disposable batteries. The Sofirn Mini SC13 features a USB Type-C rechargeable battery, allowing you to charge it quickly and easily from any USB-compatible device. Whether you’re at home, in the car, or on the go, keeping your flashlight charged is simple and efficient. The inclusion of a USB C to C cable ensures you have everything you need to keep your SC13 powered up.

Lockout Function for Added Safety

Accidental activation can drain your flashlight’s battery when you need it most. The SC13 includes a lockout function to prevent this. By rotating the clip, you can cover or uncover the button, ensuring hassle-free access when you need it and preventing accidental activation when carrying it in bags or pockets. This feature helps conserve battery life and ensures your flashlight is ready when you are.

Durable and Weather-Proof Design

Constructed from aerospace-grade AL6061-T6 aluminum alloy, the Sofirn Mini SC13 is built to withstand the rigors of everyday use and harsh environments. It is impact resistant up to 1 meter and has a waterproof rating of IPX8, meaning it can be submerged in water up to 2 meters deep. This durability makes it an excellent choice for outdoor activities, professional use, and emergency situations.

Perfect for Everyday Carry

The compact size and lightweight design of the Sofirn Mini SC13 make it ideal for everyday carry. It fits easily into pockets, purses, or can be attached to a keychain. Whether you need a reliable light source for navigating dark areas, finding items in low light, or handling unexpected power outages, the SC13 is up to the task. Its easy handling and reliable performance make it a must-have accessory for daily life.

Technical Specifications

Here are some key technical details of the Sofirn Mini SC13:

  • Emitter: SST40 LED
  • Brightness: 1300 lumens
  • Beam Distance: Up to 217 meters
  • Battery: 1×18350 battery (USB Type-C rechargeable)
  • Material: AL6061-T6 aluminum alloy
  • Size: 28.5mm (head diameter) x 64.6mm (length)
  • Weight: 1.41 ounces
  • Waterproof: IPX8
  • Impact Resistance: 1 meter

Conclusion

The Sofirn Mini SC13 EDC Flashlight is a powerful and versatile tool that combines exceptional brightness with a compact and durable design. Its convenient USB Type-C rechargeable feature, lockout function, and robust construction make it a reliable choice for a wide range of applications. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a professional, or simply someone who values high-quality EDC gear, the SC13 is a flashlight that will not disappoint.

For more details and to purchase, visit the official product page.

The post Discover the Power and Portability of the Sofirn Mini SC13 EDC Flashlight appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Unleashing Power and Versatility: The IMALENT BL50 Dual Light Sources EDC Flashlight

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 12:47:21 UTC

When it comes to personal lighting solutions, the IMALENT BL50 Dual Light Sources EDC Flashlight stands out as a beacon of innovation and utility. Designed to cater to a variety of needs, from everyday carry (EDC) to specialized tasks, the BL50 offers an impressive array of features that make it a must-have for enthusiasts and professionals alike.

Unmatched Luminosity and Range

At the heart of the BL50 is the powerful CREE XHP50.3 HI LED, delivering a staggering 3600 lumens. This level of brightness ensures that whether you’re navigating a dark trail or searching for something in the shadows, the BL50 will illuminate your path with ease. With a beam distance reaching up to 428 meters, this flashlight provides the visibility required for both close-up tasks and long-range spotting.

Dual Light Sources: White and UV

One of the standout features of the BL50 is its dual light sources. In addition to the main white light, it is equipped with a 365nm UV LED. This UV light is incredibly useful for a variety of applications, such as detecting pet stains, verifying currency, and identifying fluorescent minerals. The ability to switch between white and UV light adds a layer of versatility that is rarely seen in EDC flashlights.

OLED Display for Real-Time Monitoring

The BL50 is not just about raw power; it’s also about smart functionality. The built-in OLED display provides real-time information on battery status, brightness levels, and runtime. This feature ensures that users can effectively manage their flashlight’s power and performance, making adjustments as needed without any guesswork.

Ergonomic and Durable Design

Weighing only 158 grams and boasting a compact design, the BL50 is easy to carry and handle. Its ergonomic shape ensures a comfortable grip, making it ideal for prolonged use. The flashlight is constructed from aerospace-grade aluminum alloy, providing durability and resistance to wear and tear. Additionally, it meets the IPX-8 waterproof standard, allowing it to be submerged up to 2 meters, and is impact resistant up to 1.5 meters.

Fast and Efficient Charging

With a focus on convenience, the BL50 features Type-C ultra-fast charging, reducing downtime and ensuring the flashlight is ready to go when needed. A full charge can be achieved in just 1.5 hours, and the flashlight offers an impressive runtime of up to 12 days on its lowest setting. This efficiency makes the BL50 a reliable companion for extended outdoor adventures or emergency situations.

Practical Modes for Every Situation

The BL50 offers a range of operating modes to suit different needs:

  • Turbo: 3600 lumens for maximum brightness.
  • High: 2000 lumens for powerful illumination.
  • Mid-High: 1200 lumens for balanced light output.
  • Mid-Low: 600 lumens for extended use.
  • Low: 200 lumens for general tasks.
  • Moonlight: 5 lumens for minimal light needs.

Each mode is designed to provide the right amount of light for various situations, ensuring efficiency and battery conservation.

Tactical Tail Switch and Safety Features

The tactical tail switch allows for quick and easy activation, a crucial feature in high-pressure situations. Anti-slip tactical textures enhance grip, ensuring that the flashlight remains secure in your hand. Safety is further enhanced by the built-in thermal control module, which adjusts brightness according to the flashlight’s temperature, preventing overheating and extending the lifespan of the LED.

Conclusion

The IMALENT BL50 Dual Light Sources EDC Flashlight is a perfect blend of power, versatility, and intelligent design. Its impressive brightness, dual light sources, and smart features make it an invaluable tool for a wide range of applications. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a professional needing a reliable light source, or someone who values the best in EDC gear, the BL50 is a flashlight that will not disappoint.

For more details and to purchase, visit the official product page.

The post Unleashing Power and Versatility: The IMALENT BL50 Dual Light Sources EDC Flashlight appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Discover the Wuben X3: The Ultimate EDC Flashlight

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 12:33:40 UTC

When it comes to everyday carry (EDC) flashlights, the Wuben X3 stands out as a beacon of innovation and performance. Designed for those who demand the best in portability, brightness, and reliability, the Wuben X3 is an essential tool for anyone needing a versatile and powerful light source. In this comprehensive blog post, we’ll explore the features, benefits, and applications of this exceptional EDC flashlight.

Compact Yet Powerful

The Wuben X3 is a marvel of engineering, packing an impressive amount of power into a compact frame. Despite its small size, this flashlight delivers a powerful 700 lumens, ensuring you have ample light for any situation. Whether you’re navigating dark paths, searching for items in low light, or using it for professional purposes, the X3 offers the brightness you need in a pocket-friendly design.

Advanced LED Technology

At the core of the Wuben X3 is a high-performance LED that offers superior brightness and efficiency. This advanced LED technology ensures a consistent beam with excellent coverage, making it suitable for a wide range of tasks. The LED is designed to last, providing you with a reliable light source that won’t fail when you need it most.

Rechargeable and Eco-Friendly

One of the standout features of the Wuben X3 is its rechargeable battery. This EDC flashlight is equipped with a high-capacity battery that provides extended runtime, reducing the need for frequent recharges. The USB Type-C charging port offers convenience and compatibility with various charging devices, making it easy to keep your flashlight powered up on the go.

Durable and Rugged Construction

The Wuben X3 is built to withstand the rigors of daily use and challenging environments. Constructed from high-quality materials, this flashlight is both durable and lightweight. Its robust build ensures it can handle drops, impacts, and rough handling, making it a reliable companion for outdoor adventures, professional use, and emergency situations.

Versatile Lighting Modes

The Wuben X3 offers multiple lighting modes to suit different needs. From its ultra-bright turbo mode to the energy-saving low mode, you can easily adjust the brightness to match your requirements. The flashlight also features strobe and SOS modes, adding to its versatility and making it a valuable tool for emergencies and self-defense.

Intuitive and User-Friendly Design

Designed with user convenience in mind, the Wuben X3 features an intuitive control interface. The easy-to-use switch allows for quick mode changes and ensures that you can operate the flashlight with one hand. The compact design and ergonomic shape make it comfortable to carry and use, whether you’re holding it for extended periods or keeping it in your pocket.

Waterproof and Impact Resistant

The Wuben X3 is built to perform in all conditions. With an IP68 waterproof rating, this flashlight can be submerged in water without any issues, making it ideal for use in wet or rainy environments. Its impact-resistant design ensures it can withstand drops and bumps, providing you with a dependable light source no matter where you are.

Practical Applications of the Wuben X3

The versatility of the Wuben X3 makes it suitable for a wide range of applications:

Everyday Carry

As an EDC flashlight, the Wuben X3 is perfect for daily use. Its compact size and powerful beam make it ideal for carrying in your pocket, bag, or car. Whether you need to light your way at night, find something in the dark, or have a reliable light source for emergencies, the X3 is up to the task.

Outdoor Adventures

For hikers, campers, and outdoor enthusiasts, the Wuben X3 is an essential tool. Its bright beam can illuminate trails, campsites, and outdoor areas, while its durable construction ensures it can handle the challenges of the wilderness. The waterproof and impact-resistant design means you can rely on it in all weather conditions.

Professional Use

Professionals who need a reliable and powerful flashlight will appreciate the Wuben X3. Its bright beam and long battery life make it suitable for a variety of tasks, from inspections and repairs to security and law enforcement. The versatile lighting modes and durable build ensure it meets the demands of professional use.

Emergency Situations

In emergencies, having a dependable flashlight is crucial. The Wuben X3 provides a powerful and reliable light source that can help you navigate power outages, find your way in the dark, and signal for help. Its strobe and SOS modes add an extra layer of safety, making it a valuable tool for emergency preparedness.

Technical Specifications

Here are some key technical specifications of the Wuben X3:

  • Modes: Turbo, High, Mid, Low, Strobe, SOS
  • Brightness: 700 lumens (Turbo), various lower settings for other modes
  • Runtime: Varies by mode
  • Waterproof: IP68
  • Impact Resistance: 1 meter
  • Dimensions: Compact for easy carry
  • Weight: Lightweight for portability

Conclusion

The Wuben X3 is a top-tier EDC flashlight that offers exceptional brightness, durability, and versatility. Whether you’re a professional needing a reliable light source, an outdoor enthusiast looking for the best gear, or someone preparing for emergencies, the X3 is a worthy investment. With its advanced LED technology, rechargeable battery, and rugged construction, this flashlight is designed to meet and exceed your expectations.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to own this remarkable EDC flashlight. Visit the Wuben Store to get your Wuben X3 today and experience the power of unparalleled illumination.

Why the Wuben X3 Stands Out

When choosing an EDC flashlight, several factors come into play: brightness, durability, battery life, ease of use, and additional features. The Wuben X3 excels in all these areas, making it a top choice for various applications. Here’s a closer look at why this flashlight stands out in a crowded market:

Superior Brightness

The X3’s 700 lumens of brightness make it one of the most powerful EDC flashlights available. Whether you’re using it for everyday tasks, outdoor adventures, or professional purposes, the X3 ensures you have the light you need. Its ability to produce such high lumens from a compact frame is a testament to Wuben’s engineering prowess.

Long-Lasting Battery Life

The included rechargeable battery not only provides ample power but also offers impressive longevity. This means fewer interruptions and more time spent using the flashlight for its intended purposes. Plus, with USB Type-C charging, keeping your flashlight powered up is more convenient than ever.

Robust and Tactical Design

The Wuben X3’s design is a blend of form and function. Its durable construction ensures it can withstand the physical demands of everyday carry, while the intuitive controls allow for quick and easy operation. The flashlight’s robust build makes it a reliable tool for various applications.

Waterproof and Impact Resistant

With an IP68 waterproof rating and 1-meter impact resistance, the X3 is built to perform in harsh conditions. Whether you’re caught in a downpour or need to navigate rough terrain, this flashlight is designed to endure and provide reliable performance.

Versatile Lighting Modes

The X3 offers multiple lighting modes, including Turbo, High, Mid, Low, Strobe, and SOS. This versatility allows you to adjust the brightness and function according to your needs, whether you need maximum visibility or a discreet, low-light option.

Conclusion

The Wuben X3 EDC Flashlight is a top-tier flashlight that offers exceptional brightness, durability, and versatility. Whether you’re a professional in need of a reliable light source or an outdoor enthusiast looking for the best gear, the X3 is a worthy investment. With its advanced LED technology, rechargeable battery, and rugged construction, this flashlight is designed to meet and exceed your expectations.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to own this remarkable EDC flashlight. Visit the Wuben Store to get your Wuben X3 today and experience the power of unparalleled illumination.

The post Discover the Wuben X3: The Ultimate EDC Flashlight appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Unleash the Power of the Brinyte PT16A: Your Ultimate Tactical Companion

Posted by Piju 9M2PJU on 2024-07-18 12:23:46 UTC

In the realm of tactical flashlights, the Brinyte PT16A stands out as a true powerhouse. This compact yet mighty device delivers a staggering 3000 lumens, providing unparalleled brightness and reliability. Whether you’re an outdoor enthusiast, a professional in need of dependable illumination, or someone looking for a robust emergency light, the PT16A has you covered. In this comprehensive blog post, we’ll dive deep into the features, benefits, and applications of this remarkable flashlight.

Exceptional Illumination

At the heart of the Brinyte PT16A is the advanced SFT70 Luminus LED, which ensures top-notch performance and efficiency. This LED technology not only offers superior brightness but also guarantees longevity and consistent illumination. With a maximum output of 3000 lumens, the PT16A can light up your surroundings with crystal-clear clarity. Its impressive beam distance of over 458 meters makes it perfect for long-range visibility, whether you’re navigating through dense forests or inspecting large industrial sites.

Advanced LED Technology

The SFT70 Luminus LED is renowned for its high brightness and efficiency. This cutting-edge LED bulb provides bright, uniform light, making it suitable for a wide range of lighting applications. From outdoor adventures to tactical operations, the PT16A’s LED technology ensures you have a reliable light source that won’t let you down.

Rechargeable and Eco-Friendly

Say goodbye to disposable batteries and embrace the eco-friendly benefits of the PT16A’s rechargeable 21700 5000mAh Li-ion battery. This high-capacity battery offers extended runtime, ensuring your flashlight is ready whenever you need it. The convenience of USB Type-C charging means you can easily recharge your flashlight from various power sources, whether you’re at home, in your car, or out in the wilderness.

Tactical Tail Switch for Instant Activation

In high-pressure situations, quick and easy operation is crucial. The PT16A features a dual tactical tail switch design, allowing for instant activation and strobe functions. This makes it an ideal tool for tactical scenarios or emergencies where rapid response is essential. Whether you’re a law enforcement officer, a security professional, or an outdoor adventurer, the PT16A’s intuitive controls ensure you’re always in command.

Durable and Rugged Construction

Crafted from A6061-T6 aluminum, the PT16A boasts a rugged yet lightweight construction that can withstand the rigors of daily use and harsh outdoor conditions. Its hard-anodized finish not only adds a sleek, professional look but also provides enhanced resistance to scratches, abrasions, and corrosion. This robust design ensures the PT16A remains durable and reliable, even in the most challenging environments.

Versatile Applications

The Brinyte PT16A is more than just a flashlight; it’s a versatile tool designed to meet various needs. Its tactical strike head is perfect for breaking glass or other hard objects, offering self-rescue options in emergencies. When placed upside down, the flashlight provides low-light concealment, adding to its tactical utility. Additionally, the one-click strobe and SOS light design make it an essential tool for self-defense and emergency situations.

Comprehensive Package Options

The PT16A is available in four distinct configurations to suit different needs and preferences:

  1. Standard: Includes the PT16A flashlight, 21700 5000mAh battery, USB-C charging cable, and two O-rings.
  2. Outdoor: Adds a tactical ring and holster to the standard package.
  3. Tactical: Includes a remote switch and BRM21 mount along with the standard components.
  4. Tactical Kit: Combines the tactical ring, holster, remote switch, and BRM21 mount for the ultimate tactical setup.

Technical Specifications

Here are some key technical specifications of the Brinyte PT16A:

  • Modes: Turbo, High, Mid, Low, Strobe, SOS
  • Brightness: 3000 lumens (Turbo), 900 lumens (High), 120 lumens (Mid), 5 lumens (Low), 3000 lumens (Strobe), 120 lumens (SOS)
  • Runtime: 1+135 minutes (Turbo), 3 hours 50 minutes (High), 20 hours (Mid), 300 hours (Low)
  • Beam Distance: 458 meters
  • Impact Resistance: 1 meter
  • Waterproof: IP68
  • Dimensions: 159mm (Length) x 27mm (Body Diameter) x 39mm (Head Diameter)
  • Weight: 152g (excluding battery)

Conclusion

The Brinyte PT16A 3000Lumens Tactical Light is a top-tier flashlight that offers exceptional brightness, durability, and versatility. Whether you’re a professional in need of a reliable light source or an outdoor enthusiast looking for the best gear, the PT16A is a worthy investment. With its advanced LED technology, rechargeable battery, and rugged construction, this flashlight is designed to meet and exceed your expectations.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to own this remarkable tactical flashlight. Visit the Brinyte Store to get your Brinyte PT16A today and experience the power of unparalleled illumination.

Why the Brinyte PT16A Stands Out

When choosing a tactical flashlight, several factors come into play: brightness, durability, battery life, ease of use, and additional features. The Brinyte PT16A excels in all these areas, making it a top choice for various applications. Here’s a closer look at why this flashlight stands out in a crowded market:

Superior Brightness

The PT16A’s 3000 lumens of brightness put it at the top of its class. Whether you’re using it for search and rescue operations, nighttime outdoor activities, or as a reliable light source during power outages, the PT16A ensures you have the light you need. Its ability to produce such high lumens from a compact frame is a testament to Brinyte’s engineering prowess.

Long-Lasting Battery Life

The included 21700 5000mAh Li-ion battery not only provides ample power but also offers impressive longevity. This means fewer interruptions and more time spent using the flashlight for its intended purposes. Plus, with USB Type-C charging, keeping your flashlight powered up is more convenient than ever.

Robust and Tactical Design

The Brinyte PT16A’s design is a blend of form and function. Its aluminum construction ensures it can withstand the physical demands of tactical use, while the dual tactical tail switch allows for quick and intuitive operation. The strike bezel adds an element of self-defense, making it a versatile tool for law enforcement and personal safety.

Waterproof and Impact Resistant

With an IP68 waterproof rating and 1-meter impact resistance, the PT16A is built to perform in harsh conditions. Whether you’re caught in a downpour or need to navigate rough terrain, this flashlight is designed to endure and provide reliable performance.

Versatile Lighting Modes

The PT16A offers multiple lighting modes, including Turbo, High, Mid, Low, Strobe, and SOS. This versatility allows you to adjust the brightness and function according to your needs, whether you need maximum visibility or a discreet, low-light option.

Practical Applications of the Brinyte PT16A

The Brinyte PT16A is designed to be a versatile tool suitable for a wide range of applications. Here are some practical ways you can use this powerful tactical flashlight:

Outdoor Adventures

For hikers, campers, and outdoor enthusiasts, the PT16A is an indispensable tool. Its bright beam illuminates trails and campsites, while the long battery life ensures it lasts through extended adventures. The durable construction means it can handle drops, bumps, and exposure to the elements.

Search and Rescue Operations

In search and rescue scenarios, reliable illumination is critical. The PT16A’s powerful beam can cut through darkness and reach long distances, making it easier to locate individuals and navigate challenging environments. The strobe and SOS modes also provide essential signaling capabilities in emergencies.

Law Enforcement and Security

For law enforcement officers and security professionals, the PT16A offers features tailored to their needs. The tactical tail switch allows for quick activation, and the strike bezel can be used in self-defense situations. The flashlight’s robust build ensures it can withstand the demands of the job.

Home and Personal Safety

Having a reliable flashlight at home is crucial for emergencies and power outages. The PT16A’s high lumen output ensures you can see clearly in the dark, while its durable design means it will be ready when you need it. Keep one in your emergency kit, and you’ll have peace of mind knowing you have a dependable light source.

Conclusion

The Brinyte PT16A 3000Lumens Tactical Light is a top-tier flashlight that offers exceptional brightness, durability, and versatility. Whether you’re a professional in need of a reliable light source or an outdoor enthusiast looking for the best gear, the PT16A is a worthy investment. With its advanced LED technology, rechargeable battery, and rugged construction, this flashlight is designed to meet and exceed your expectations.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to own this remarkable tactical flashlight. Visit the Brinyte Store to get your Brinyte PT16A today and experience the power of unparalleled illumination.

The post Unleash the Power of the Brinyte PT16A: Your Ultimate Tactical Companion appeared first on HamRadio.My - Ham Radio, Fun Facts, Open Source Software, Tech Insights, Product Reviews by 9M2PJU.

Fedora Week of Diversity 2024 in Numbers

Posted by Fedora Community Blog on 2024-07-17 08:00:00 UTC

Fedora Week of Diversity (FWD) 2024 was a success, celebrating the unique voices and experiences within the Fedora community. From inspiring interviews to engaging virtual sessions hosted on Matrix, this year’s Fedora Week of Diversity showcased the strength and spirit of the community. Attendees registered for the event through Pretix, and session recordings were made available on YouTube for wider access. Let’s dive into the numbers and highlights from this impactful event.

Key Highlights From Fedora Week of Diversity 2024

  • 9 Inspiring Interviews: FWD featured nine interviews with community members on the Fedora Community Blog, where they shared their personal journeys and perspectives within the Fedora Project.
  • Community Video: A heartwarming video celebrating the spirit of togetherness within the Fedora community was released, featuring 15 enthusiastic participants. You can watch it on Fedora’s YouTube page.
  • Virtual Event Success: The virtual event on June 21st drew 35 attendees on Matrix, with 11 speakers leading 6 engaging sessions on various topics related to diversity and inclusion.
  • Recorded Sessions: All virtual sessions were recorded and made available on YouTube for wider access and continued learning. You can find the playlist here
  • 34 Badge Earners: 34 participants earned the exclusive FWD 2024 badge, demonstrating their active involvement and commitment to the Fedora community.

Fedora Community Engagement:

The Fedora Week of Diversity saw active participation from the community through:

  • Virtual Attendance: 35 community members joined the virtual event on Matrix, eager to learn and connect with others.
  • Engaging Sessions: Throughout the six sessions, participants actively attended and interacted with speakers, thereby fostering meaningful discussions and a vibrant exchange of ideas.
  • Watching Interviews: Community members viewed and engaged with the 9 interviews shared on the Fedora Community Blog, gaining insights into the diverse experiences within Fedora.
  • Social Sharing: The community enthusiastically shared the event’s video and content on social media platforms, further amplifying the message of Fedora Week of Diversity.

Community Participation and Recognition:

Virtual Event:

  • Speakers: A big thank you to our speakers Apurva Bhide, Rajan Shah, Mohammadreza Hendiani, Fernando Mancera, Deepesha Burse, Benny Vasquez, Vipul Siddharth, Shuchi Sharma, Amita Sharma, Justin W. Flory, whose insightful and engaging presentations contributed significantly to the success of Fedora Week of Diversity.
  • Attendees: Thank you to all 35 attendees for your active participation and contributions to the discussions.

Interviewees and Video Participants:

  • We extend our gratitude to the interviewees Ankur Sinha, Roland Taylor, Robert Wright, Nikita Tripathi, Chris Idoko, Joseph Gayoso, Adrian Edwards, Roseline Bassey, and Tosin Doreen for sharing their stories.
  • We also extend our heartfelt appreciation to the 15 community members who enthusiastically participated in the FWD video, further showcasing the vibrant spirit and diversity within the Fedora community.
A screenshot of some of the speakers at this year's FWD event

Survey Results:

Speakers:

Note: These results are based on feedback from a small sample of speakers who completed a post-event survey.

  • 100% of respondents were satisfied with their Fedora Week of Diversity experience, with 50% being very satisfied.
  • 100% of respondents enjoyed sharing their stories.
  • 100% of respondents felt they had enough time to answer questions.
  • 50% of respondents had a favorite moment during their session.
  • 50% of respondents were able to attend other talks at the event.
A snapshot of the speaker survey results

Participants:

Note: These results are based on feedback from a small sample of the total event attendees.

  • 100% of respondents were very satisfied with the Fedora Week of Diversity event.
  • 100% of respondents were extremely likely to recommend FWD.
  • Learning New Things: 100% of respondents rated this aspect 4 or 5 out of 5.
  • Experiencing Fedora’s Diverse Community: 100% of respondents rated this aspect 5/5.
  • Social and Networking Opportunities: 75% of respondents rated this aspect 4/5, and 25% rated it 3/5.
  • Speakers: 75% of respondents rated this aspect 5/5, and 25% rated it 4/5.
  • Number of Sessions: 75% of respondents rated this aspect 5/5, and 25% rated it 4/5.
  • 100% of respondents feel they know the Fedora Community better after Fedora Week of Diversity.
A snapshot of the participants survey results

Where Respondents Learned About the Event

  • 25% from Instagram
  • 50% from the Fedora Community Blog
  • 25% from Element (Matrix Room)
Numbers from the event discovery channels

Lessons Learned and Recommendations:

  • Expanding Feedback Collection for Future Events: Gather more post-event feedback to understand attendee and speaker experiences better.
  • Enhancing Virtual Engagement through Interactive Elements: Add interactive elements like live Q&A or breakout discussions to virtual events.
  • Fostering a More Inclusive Fedora Community: Continue to promote diversity and inclusion within the Fedora community by showcasing diverse voices and perspectives in future Fedora Week of Diversity events.

Conclusion:

Fedora Week of Diversity 2024 successfully celebrated the diverse voices within the Fedora community. The event fostered connection, learning, and a sense of belonging. We look forward to continuing this tradition in the years to come.

Stay tuned for announcements about future Fedora Week of Diversity events!

Join the Community:

Get involved in Fedora and participate in future events by visiting the Fedora Project Website

The post Fedora Week of Diversity 2024 in Numbers appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

“No one remembers ‘that one day I spent in front of the TV'”

Posted by Stephen Gallagher on 2024-07-16 20:28:31 UTC

Yesterday, as I was scrolling on social media I happened across a post. It was one of those basic “nostalgic picture with an excessively generic quote” posts that seems to be “recommended” every seventh entry or so. This one caught my eye, though for reasons I couldn’t immediately describe. It was a picture of kids riding their bicycles down a suburban street with the quote (paraphrased, since I don’t recall the exact wording): “No one remembers ‘that one day I spent in front of the TV'”. Obviously, the message was “go outside and do stuff”, but the arrogance and condescension implicit in the phrasing bothered me. It kept running through my mind all day, and I couldn’t quite put it down.

It wasn’t until the middle of the night last night, as I awoke from some dream or another that it hit me why it bothered me so much. It isn’t just that I’ve spent so much of my life in front of screens (I am a professional software engineer, after all). It’s that subconsciously I was realizing just how many “days in front of the TV” I really do have fond memories of. I think my mind was trying to clue me in to how insulting that meme was. The implication was that my memories are somehow lesser than those taking place outside my home.

I woke up in the middle of the night and couldn’t let it go. I decided that I was going to write this up today, because I feel like I need to chronicle my experience — for my own reasons, yes, but also for anyone else who might feel the same way. I’ve known plenty of people who were belittled or mocked while we were growing up for enjoying videogames and TV more than sports and wandering. So I decided I was going to write down some of the great memories that I have had in my life “in front of the TV”. Some of these dates might be approximate (or flat-out wrong!), but that’s the nature of memory: the feelings persist, even when the details fade.

Christmas, 1993: Under the Christmas tree, my brother and I tore open a package to discover Super Mario Kart. We were ecstatic. We convinced my parents to let us bring the Super Nintendo with us to my grandparents house so we could play it. We plugged it into a tiny TV in my grandparents’ bedroom and raced and raced while the grown-ups talked and drank and made merry in the other room. It would be weeks before we ever saw the final track of any of the courses. Months longer before we discovered the Special Cup. We spent hours and hours in front of that game. I’m not sure I’ve ever been closer to my brother than we were then.

Fall, 1998: I have just begun college and I have made some great friends. We share a common interest in Action Quake 2. We form a four-person team named (loosely) after the dorm hall most of them lived in. In the era before ubiquitous laptops, I dragged my desktop computer down to the dorm when we played. Laughing and jeering, we spent many an evening like that. I miss those friends (one in particular who is no longer with us).

Winter, 2001: My parents bought us an Xbox and Halo for Christmas, then took us up to New Hampshire to go skiing. We spent all day on the slopes and then unwound by sipping cocoa and playing Halo co-op well into the night every day of that school vacation. I think we even finished the campaign before I went back to school for the spring semester.

The latter half of the 2000s: Once a week, I gather with some of my closest friends for videogames. We order takeout, complain about nothing, and play Warcraft 2 and 3, Left4Dead 2, Moonbase Commander and more. This tradition continues, waxing and waning, to this day. Participants have come and gone, but the joy endures. Tonight I’ll be playing Baldur’s Gate 3 with some of the original members of this tribe.

February 23rd, 2011: My wife and I are playing a Tiger Woods Golf on the Nintendo Wii. She is more than nine months pregnant. The daughter we have tried so hard for years to bring into the world is being stubborn and is a week past her due date. The movement of the golf swing induces her labor and we finally welcome my firstborn into the world the next day. When her little sister is similarly stubborn two and a half years later, the same golf game helps bring her into the world too.

Winter and Spring, 2022: I am sitting in the living room, playing the wonderful cooperative game It Takes Two from beginning to end with each of my daughters. We’re working together and helping each other through it and loving every minute of it. It brings me back to my own childhood.

Last night, after dinner, I asked my eldest if she wanted to do something together. She asked if I wanted to design a theme park together in Planet Coaster. You’re damned right I did.

In the end, it’s not the activity that matters. It’s the people you spend time with that do.

How to archive a local copy of CentOS 7

Posted by Stephen Smoogen on 2024-07-16 18:23:00 UTC

How to archive a local copy of CentOS 7

How to archive a local copy of CentOS 7

This post is meant for the various junior system administrators who have been tasked with fixing problems with CentOS 7 systems after the software was removed from most of its mirrors. Most of these systems have probably been running fine for a decade, and now possible critical systems are generating failed cron jobs or other errors.

What happened?

On July 1st, 2024, CentOS Enterprise Linux 7 reached its end of life as its upstream, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, had moved to Extended Life(cycle) Support. As with previous releases, the operating system was moved from the main mirrors to the CentOS vault, and the mirrorlists were turned off. Once the software was removed from the main mirrors, many secondary mirrors also removed the software as rsync and similar scripts would see the old software was gone. At this point, some unknown number of CentOS Linux systems ended up ‘non-supported.’

The systems may have been extremely low maintenance for years running whatever tasks they had been without a problem. The people who initially set them up have probably moved to other jobs, and some new person is now finding out that things are broken. Maybe its a cron job which runs one a week to run updates, or the kickstart used to reinstall an old server now breaks. In most of these cases, there is little documentation on what is being used, why it is being used, or how big a problem this is going to be.

What is needed to be done?

Getting an infrastructure out of this place is really out of scope of a single blog post. It generally requires getting various levels of managements attention, and then long term planning on how to transform an infrastructure into something more manageable. However in the short term a site can make things workable by making a local mirror of content from an upstream vault.

The reason to use a local vault is that the existing upstream vaults are limited in bandwidth and scope. Plus as more sites try to use them, the services may be curtailed or removed. When dealing with ‘End of Life’ projects and software, it is better to assume that things will get worse before they get better.

Hardware and software requirements

In order to mirror CentOS 7 locally, you are going to need to set up a webserver with at least 500 GB of free space (if you don’t want to copy the out of date ‘atomic’ trees. ) The amount of memory and cpu cores needed is dependent on the number of servers you are going to be supporting. The more systems, the more memory and cores that might be needed. In any case, I was able to set up a system with 2 cores and 4 GB of ram to support 4 EL7 systems without problems.

Internet requirements

There are currently 3 major mirrors of the CentOS vault.

  • archive.kernel.org
  • linuxsoft.cern.ch
  • mirror.nsc.liu

It is best to find one which is ‘network’ close and set up scripts to rsync data from the site. I found that each server will be busier at different times, so expect that copying will take multiple hours.

Sample Rsync script

The script I used to do this was the following:

#!/bin/bash

VAULT=archive.kernel.org::centos-vault/
TREEDIR=/srv/mirrors/

RSYNC_OPTS='-avSHP --delete-excluded'

## Mirror CentOS 7
mkdir -vp ${TREEDIR}/centos-vault/7.9/
EXCLUDE_ITEMS="--exclude=atomic/"
rsync ${RSYNC_OPTS} ${EXCLUDE_ITEMS}  ${VAULT}/7.9.2009/ ${TREEDIR}/centos-vault/7.9/

Sample HTTPD config

In my /etc/httpd/conf.d/ I added the following config file:

Alias "/mirrors" "/srv/mirrors"
<Directory /srv/mirrors>
  AllowOverride None
  Require all granted
  Options +Indexes
</Directory>

Sample Yum repo config

Finally on the EL7 systems, I used a config like the following in /etc/yum.repos.d/CentOS-EOL.repo

[base]
name=CentOS-$releasever - Base
baseurl=http://192.168.1.150/mirrors/centos-vault/7.9/os/$basearch/
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-CentOS-7

#released updates
[updates]
name=CentOS-$releasever - Updates
baseurl=http://192.168.1.150/mirrors/centos-vault/7.9/updates/$basearch/
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-CentOS-7

#additional packages that may be useful
[extras]
name=CentOS-$releasever - Extras
baseurl=http://192.168.1.150/mirrors/centos-vault/7.9/extras/$basearch/
gpgcheck=1
enabled=1
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-CentOS-7

[centosplus]
name=CentOS-$releasever - Plus
baseurl=http://192.168.1.150/mirrors/centos-vault/7.9/centosplus/$basearch/
gpgcheck=1
enabled=0
gpgkey=file:///etc/pki/rpm-gpg/RPM-GPG-KEY-CentOS-7

At this point, updates were possible and I was able to reinstall a system in order to rebuild some packages I needed. Similar work can be done to set up mirrors of CentOS Linux 6 or third party repositories like EPEL.

Gutenberg Bible at the Harvard Widener Library

Posted by Avi Alkalay on 2024-07-16 12:01:48 UTC

The most revolutionary medieval artifact I’ve seen today. The Gutenberg Bible, the first book printed in a movable-type printing press, which, in contrast to hand-written books, enabled a much faster rate of printing and led to an information revolution and the unprecedented mass-spread of literature throughout Europe.

Detail of the Gutenberg Bible

Not more than 270 copies were printed circa 1460 in Mainz (now Germany), using Gothic typeface in 42 lines of Latin language justified text, with an ink that is actually varnish, also invented by Johannes Gutenberg himself for his press. Rubrication and illumination to decorate the text were handcrafted after printing and increases the price of a copy. Only 49 copies survived.

These photos are from the Harvard Widener Library copy, which I visited today.

Gutenberg Bible whole first volume book
Gutenberg Bible detail with rubrication and illumination

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Introducing the Fedora Community Operations Initiative

Posted by Fedora Community Blog on 2024-07-16 08:00:00 UTC

We’re excited to unveil the Fedora Community Operations initiative, an endeavor to boost community engagement, support everyone with more events and contribution points, and build on our amazing culture.

What is the Fedora Community Operations Initiative?

At its heart, the Community Operations Initiative is all about making Fedora an even better place to collaborate and connect. We’re focusing on two main contribution areas: Contributor Experience and Community Social Analytics. Contributor Experience means working on unified documentation, improving onboarding processes, and organizing fantastic virtual events like the Fedora Linux 40 and 41 Release Parties. Community Social Analytics will explore data from our infrastructure tools, applications, and services to help Fedora leadership and the community make smarter decisions, ultimately making Fedora an even more welcoming and efficient community for everyone.

What Does the Community Operations Initiative Aim to Achieve?

The main goal of the Initiative is to streamline and enhance the experience for all Fedora contributors. We want to make it super easy for anyone to jump in and start contributing. That’s why Contributor Experience contributors will enhance existing documentation and create new documentation for onboarding and virtual events, standardize best practices across teams, and recognize and support the amazing mentors in our community. At the same time, Community Social Analytics will gather and analyze data from Fedora infrastructure tools, applications, and services to better understand community health and trends. (This is not related to Fedora Linux user data—our focus is toward systems that interact with the Fedora Account System, or FAS.) This will provide us create a baseline measure for the Fedora 2028 Strategy and support data-driven decisions that benefit the whole community.

What Can Fedora Gain from the Community Operations Initiative?

Improved documentation and standardized processes will make it easier for new contributors to join and get involved. Enhanced onboarding and mentor recognition will help us retain contributors and create a supportive environment. With data-driven insights, we can make informed decisions that align with long-term goals like the Fedora 2028 Strategy.

Ultimately, the Community Operations Initiative will lead to a more organized, efficient, and welcoming community, paving the way for Fedora’s growth and success. This is an exciting opportunity for anyone to shape the future of our community together.

What Do We Need from the Community?

To make this happen, we need you, the Fedora community! We’re calling on both new and experienced contributors to share their knowledge and insights. Participate in surveys and give us feedback on our processes. Help us identify areas for improvement and ensure our documentation is up-to-date and effective. Your involvement is crucial in helping us create a more cohesive and impactful community.

How Can Contributors Help?

There are plenty of ways to get involved and support the Community Operations Initiative.

Every little bit helps us move closer to our goals and strengthens the Fedora community.

Where Can You Find Us?

Does any of this sound interesting to you? Come and join us! You can find us on Matrix at #commops:fedoraproject.org. We have a growing team of contributors from around the globe.

Join us on this exciting journey to build the Fedora Community Operations Team toward a sustainable future. To get started, visit our Matrix channel, join the conversation on Fedora Discussion, or reach out to our team members directly.

We will continue to share regular updates on our progress through Community Blog posts and Fedora Council video update soon. Let’s make Fedora even more awesome together!

The post Introducing the Fedora Community Operations Initiative appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 15 July 1300 UTC

Posted by Ankur Sinha on 2024-07-15 09:53:33 UTC
Photo by William White on Unsplash

Photo by William White on Unsplash.


Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 15 July at 1300 UTC. The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend. You can join us in the Fedora meeting channel on chat.fedoraproject.org (our Matrix instance). Note that you can also access this channel from other Matrix home severs, so you do not have to create a Fedora account just to attend the meeting.

You can use this link to convert the meeting time to your local time. Or, you can also use this command in the terminal:

$ date -d 'Monday, July 15, 2024 13:00 UTC'

The meeting will be chaired by @ankursinha. The agenda for the meeting is:

We hope to see you there!

Honoring a Fedora legend: Mel Chua

Posted by Fedora Community Blog on 2024-07-15 08:00:00 UTC

Content Warning: Cancer, hospice care.

The Fedora Council recently received the news that Mel Chua, a Fedora contributor in the early and formative days of the Project, was placed in hospice care after a long battle against cancer. On behalf of the Fedora community, we extend our condolences and love for Mel and her loved ones. In May, we asked the community to share stories and memories of Mel at the F40 Release Party opening remarks. To honor her memory for the next generation of Fedora contributors, we compiled the stories and a reflection on Mel’s impact on Fedora, its trajectory as a Free Software community, and most importantly, her impact on the people of our community.

About Mel Chua

For many years, Dr. Mel Chua is quite literally one of the faces of “Friends” in the Fedora Project. In the Fedora Project documentation, on the page that describes the entire Fedora Project, there is a photo under the Friends Foundation section. These four faces are the literal stock photo of what we mean when we talk about the Friends Foundation in Fedora.

From docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/project/#_friends

For a while, I thought it was time to update the photo to something more recent. But the photo was always a really good picture of a Fedora moment. And why fix what is not broken? But today, this photo brings us a beautiful memory of an early “community biologist” of the Fedora Project, Dr. Mel Chua, who traveled through Wiki pages, spanned out over the IRC channels, triaged legions of Trac git repositories, and so much more.

In May, Mel entered hospice care about a long battle with cancer. There is a crowdfunding campaign for her medical expenses as well as the back-story to her situation. The news is difficult to process. Mel has always been a Fedoran. The Four Foundations feels fitting for someone who has advocated for open and accessible work, blazed a path forward early in Fedora and open source history, and most importantly, leaves behind a legacy of compassion, kindness, and inclusion with the things she touched.

Community stories about Mel Chua

These stories were shared by members of the Fedora community in response to the news in May. These stories are published with the consent of the person who shared the story. We hope these stories help to tell the story of her life and her impact in our community.

Stephen Smoogen

“One my most favorite FUDcon memories was my first one where I tried to run a last minute D&D game with too little preparation and was really worried it was going to fall apart. Mel had never played D&D but she had a great time going through all the prep I hadn’t done.. getting characters built, getting into character, playing around with the other players, etc. It made me feel part of Fedora, and has been one of my goto memories when I think everything is going to fall apart. Thank you Mel.”

Mike Nolan

“I first met Mel as an undergrad student at RIT. Meeting Mel was just an initial several hour conversation over a cup of coffee on the campus Starbucks that somehow, nearly a decade later ended up in me pursuing a PhD program on my own. Inspiration comes from the strangest of places but finding someone who was infinitely curious and embodied the spirit of what many hope academia to be inspired me in a way that stuck with me for what I think will be the rest of my life. The inspiration you leave us exceeds your years by magnitudes.”

Julie Pichon

“Many years ago, Mel Chua gave me thoughtful advice and connected me to other members of the Sugar Labs community, back when I was still very new to contributing to open source. These were just a few conversations but they meant a lot to me, and modelled the kind of helpful and encouraging behaviour I continue to try my best to emulate in the communities I’m a part of. I was already looking up to Mel a lot before that, but that only cemented it further.”

Stephen Jacobs

“I first met Mel Chua in 2009 while she was working for Fedora/Red Hat. I was teaching my first Humanitarian Free and Open Source Software class at RIT, and she quickly became a staunch supporter of my work. She became a key team member, teaching me about FOSS’s long and winding road. 

Just as quickly she became a part of my extended family because my wife, Patti Durr, who is partially Deaf herself, was a faculty member at RIT’s National Technical Institute of the Deaf (NTID,) in the Department of Deaf Cultural Studies. She adopted Patti as a role model, as she’d had little exposure to Deaf faculty before meeting her.

Through the years, we continued as professional colleagues and close friends. No matter where she was in the world and in her career, she was a regular guest lecturer in my classes. I encouraged her to take a fellowship at NTID. We worked with other NTID colleagues on the first grant proposal for World Around You, an Open-Content digital library of storybooks in international sign languages built on an Open-Source platform. 

We worked together on our proposal (with her as the lead) for the Critical Digital Infrastructure program, doing a qualitative study of PyPI for that program. The additional work we had to do to acquire funding support for ASL interpreters and transcription services for that effort directly led to the recent work we did together on Open@RIT’s position paper on Accessibility Issues in Federal Grant Funding over the last six months. 

In the last few years, I’ve been able to visit her in California where she was getting treatment, most recently this past March. Despite the fact that she’d been through four surgeries in five weeks, her intellect, passion, and sense of humor showed through. 

When I received the recent news of her transition to home hospice, I was (and am) heartbroken, though not surprised. I can’t find the words to express how much of a positive impact Mel has had on my work, our shared work, my family, the experiences of my students, and the world of FOSS writ large. Nor can I find the words to convey just how much I will miss her.”

Remy DeCausemaker (decause)

“Anyone can teach. Everyone can learn. Even professors.

POSSE (The Professor’s Open Source Summer Experience) was a 3 day bootcamp for the brightest minds in computer science on our campus, and from campuses near and far, to learn?

I was there just as a volunteer, just to help, just to listen, just to learn too. In those few short days, I learned bedrock concepts that would become the foundation of my pedagogical approach to teaching and learning, but there was one particular pearl of wisdom that shone above all. You credited this to Chris Tyler from Seneca College, who introduced it at the first POSSE as something he and Dave Humphries explicitly teach their students. Together, it was a lesson they taught us:

“Be Productively Lost.”

It is jarring, terrifying even, especially as the more of an expert you become, to not understand. To feel lost, to feel ignorant, to feel like a beginner. The further you progress from the beginning of your journey, the more daunting it feels to start over.

The more you learn to not only accept but embrace this discomfort, the better you become at traveling the paths of the Unknown. Fear of being Lost keeps people from seeking and from finding. You will forgo entire universes of possibility if you stick only to what you know, and are unwilling to take the risk.

You taught us not only about how learning to be comfortable in strange spaces and strange lands makes you a more capable traveler–less afraid of the roads less traveled–but you also taught us how to leave breadcrumb trails to find your way back.

You taught me about the true meaning of Pioneering. Not merely going deeper into the unknown for the sake of going first, or going furthest, but so that you could bring as many people with you after, or even along the way.

Documentation, storytelling, questions, answers, sharing, doing, working, living, Openly.

This is the way.

This is the way that you feel not so lost. By sensemaking and orienteering and leaving breadcrumbs for yourself and for others. By teaching, by sharing, you best understand your journey.

And what’s more illuminating than all of that–counter to the tired and supremely destructive tropes hackers continue repeating to ourselves about “basement dwelling lone-wolf geniuses” who only by gift of chance or birth are singularly capable of great feats of wizardry in the magic of coding–you showed us that no one is nor needs be alone on that journey.

It is amongst The Community that you experience not only the support to navigate the Unknown, but the Triumph of Discovery–of finding and being found.

I have repeated to every new traveler beginning their own Hacker’s journey, every single one of them, these 3 seemingly simple words. Be Productively Lost. They changed my life, and I know they have changed the lives of hundreds of others.

And that was before watching you live them.

Becoming an exemplar of Pioneering. Starting over. Facing the unknown. Learning entirely new languages. Moving to new entirely places. Surmounting the highest levels of academia. Facing the unimaginable challenges of an uncooperative body, housing one the most collaborative minds I have ever known. It is the definition of Tragedy. Losing so soon such a bright mind, to such senseless, dark, circumstances.

But when it is darkest, light shines brightest.

I would offer 3 different quotes from 3 different times that each emanate from that same intellectual and spiritual wisdom that you shared with us, within which I find peace and purpose, and I hope you will too.

“Let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds.”

“Those who light their candle at mine, receive light, without darkening me.”

“Thousands of candles can be lit by a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened.”

Thank you for being unafraid to be lost, thank you for being brave enough to go into the dark, and thank you, eternally, for not just shining bright, but for teaching us all how to light the way for each other <3″

The post Honoring a Fedora legend: Mel Chua appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

Fedora Infra musings for the Second week of july 2024

Posted by Kevin Fenzi on 2024-07-13 01:38:19 UTC

This week started out fun with some Oral surgery on monday. Luckily it all went very well. I went to sleep, woke up when they were done and had a bunch of pain medication on board. I’m getting pretty sick of ‘soft’ foods however.

Tuesday we had our logserver 100% full. Turns out a toddler (thing that takes actions on message bus messages) was crashing in a loop. When it does this it puts the message back on the queue and tries again. This works fine if it’s some kind of transitory error and it can process it after a short while, but doesn’t work very well at all if it needs intervention. So, 350GB of syslog later we disabled it until we can fix it. We did have some disucssion about this problem, and it seems like the way to go might be to cause the entire pod to crash on these things. That way it would alert us and require intervention instead of looping on something it can’t ever process. Also, right now the toddlers are just generic pods that run all the handlers, but we are looking at a poddlers setup where each handler has it’s own pod. That way a crash of one will not block all the rest. Interesting stuff.

Our new, updated mailman instance has been having memory pressure problems. We were finally able to track it down to the ‘full text search’ causing memory spikes in gunicorn workers. It’s rebuilding it’s indexes, but it’s not been able to finish doing so yet, so without those this search is really memory intensive. So, we are going to disable it for now until the indexing is all caught up. This seems to have really helped it out. Fingers crossed.

This week was a mass update/reboot cycle. We try and do these every few months to pick up on non security updates (security updates get applied daily). So, on tuesday I did all the staging hosts and various other hosts I could do that wouldn’t cause any outages for users/maintainers. Wed was the big event and all the rest were done. Ansible does make this pretty reasonable to do, but of course there’s always things that don’t apply right, don’t reboot right, or break somehow. There’s a share of those this time:

  • All of our old lenovo emag aarch64 buildhw’s wouldn’t reboot. (see below)
  • koji hubs fedora-messaging plugin wasn’t working. Turns out the hardening in the f40 httpd service file prevented it from working. I’ve overridden that for now, but we should fix it to not need that override.
  • Our staging openshift cluster had a node with a disk that died. This disk was used for storage, so the upgrade couldn’t continue. Finally got it to delete that and continue today.
  • flatpak builds were broken because f40 builders meant that we switched to createrepo_c 1.0, and thus, zstd by default. flatpak sig folks have fixes in the pipeline.
  • epel8 builds were broken by f40’s dnf no longer downloading filelists. rhel8 has requirements for /usr/libexec/platform-python that wouldn’t work anymore, so no builds.I’ve just added platform-python to the koji epel8 build groups for now. Perhaps there will be a larger fix in mock.

So, we have a number of old lenovo emags. They have been our primary aarch64 builders for ages (since about 2019 or so). They are now no longer under warentee, and we have slowly been replacing them with newer boxes. They now will no longer boot at all. It seems like it has to be a shim or grub problem, but I can’t really seem to get it working even with older versions, so I am now thinking it might be a firmware problem. There is actually a (slightly) newer firmware, if I can get a copy. Failing that we may have to accelerate our retirement’s around these. They really served long and well, and are actually pretty nice hardware, but all things must end. Anyhow, looking for the new firmware to try that before giving up.

Been dealing with this bug in rawhide kernels lately. The last two days I have come in in the morning and my laptop is completely unresponsive. A few other times I have hit the kswapd storm, and backups have been taking many hours. I sure hope the fix lands soon. I might go back to f40 kernels if the upstream fix doesn’t land soon. I know I could just make my own kernel, but… I’ve done that enough in my life.

Till next week, be kind to others!

Infra and RelEng Update – Week 28 2024

Posted by Fedora Community Blog on 2024-07-12 10:00:00 UTC

This is a weekly report from the I&R (Infrastructure & Release Engineering) Team. It also contains updates for CPE (Community Platform Engineering) Team as the CPE initiatives are in most cases tied to I&R work.

We provide you both infographic and text version of the weekly report. If you just want to quickly look at what we did, just look at the infographic. If you are interested in more in depth details look below the infographic.

Week: 08 – 12 July 2024

Infra & Releng infographic

Infrastructure & Release Engineering

The purpose of this team is to take care of day to day business regarding CentOS and Fedora Infrastructure and Fedora release engineering work.
It’s responsible for services running in Fedora and CentOS infrastructure and preparing things for the new Fedora release (mirrors, mass branching, new namespaces etc.).
List of planned/in-progress issues

Fedora Infra

CentOS Infra including CentOS CI

Release Engineering

CPE Initiatives

EPEL

Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (or EPEL) is a Fedora Special Interest Group that creates, maintains, and manages a high quality set of additional packages for Enterprise Linux, including, but not limited to, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), CentOS, Scientific Linux (SL) and Oracle Linux (OL).

Updates

Community Design

CPE has few members that are working as part of Community Design Team. This team is working on anything related to design in Fedora Community.

Updates

  • Podman: Improving table pages 📃
  • CoreOS 5th anniversary designs
  • Swag designs for Flock 🐤
  • Creative Freedom Summit organizers met to start planning 2025’s summit 🤩

If you have any questions or feedback, please respond to this report or contact us on #redhat-cpe channel on matrix.

The post Infra and RelEng Update – Week 28 2024 appeared first on Fedora Community Blog.

Authselect in Fedora Linux 40: Migrating to the new “local” profile

Posted by Fedora Magazine on 2024-07-12 08:00:00 UTC

Of the many changes in Fedora Linux 40, there is one important under-the-hood Authselect profile change that is applied to new Fedora Linux 40 installations. The active Authselect profile will not be changed for upgrades. A new Authselect profile — local — will replace the minimal profile and it will be the default profile for fresh installations of Fedora Linux 40+.

To understand why this change is important and why it might make sense to manually migrate your current installation to use the new profile, this article will explain how the Linux authentication system works and compare and contrast the sssd* and local profiles.

* sssd was the default Authselect profile for installations prior to Fedora Linux 40.

An overview of Linux authentication

The first system component we should look into is PAM. Here’s an excerpt from Red Hat’s PAM documentation:

Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAMs) provide a centralized authentication mechanism which system applications can use to relay authentication to a centrally configured framework. PAM is pluggable because there is a PAM module for different types of authentication sources (such as Kerberos, SSSD, NIS, or the local file system). Different authentication sources can be prioritized.

So, PAM is a system of modules which you can combine to manage how authentication works. But why is that useful?

Several features can be enabled, either by adding new PAM modules, or by reconfiguring existing ones. Examples include:

  • auto mounting disks or paths (encrypted or not)
  • running a command on login
  • Active Directory integration
  • U2F (generic or Yubikey-specific)
  • fingerprint reader support
  • autologin

There are two drawbacks (depending on the experience level of the user/sysadmin) to managing the PAM configuration manually — the syntax used in configuration files is somewhat complex and if they are misconfigured, it might not be possible to log back into the system and undo the mistake.

With that in mind, we arrive at the legacy Authconfig tool. A description of the Authconfig tool from Red Hat is:

The Authconfig tool can help configure what kind of data store to use for user credentials, such as LDAP. On Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Authconfig has both GUI and command-line options to configure any user data stores. The Authconfig tool can configure the system to use specific services — SSSD, LDAP, NIS, or Winbind — for its user database, along with using different forms of authentication mechanisms.

Authconfig was as a tool that operated above the PAM layer and it was used to configure the authentication for a system. However, it has since been replaced by Authselect.

Some insight into Authselect can be gained by reading the rationale for its introduction to Fedora Linux 27. Here is an excerpt from the Fedora Linux 27 change set:

Authselect is a tool to select system authentication and identity sources from a list of supported profiles.

It is designed to be a replacement for Authconfig but it takes a different approach to configuring the system. Instead of letting the administrator build the PAM stack with a tool (which may potentially end up with a broken configuration), it would ship several tested stacks (profiles) that solve a use-case and are well tested and supported. At the same time, some obsolete features of Authconfig would not be supported by Authselect.

With the addition of profiles, Authselect simplifies the task of configuring system authentication and it makes authentication failures due to human error when editing PAM configuration files less likely.

To recap:

  • PAM is the underlying system for authentication in Fedora Linux. It sources configuration files under /etc/pam.d on each login and, if one of its configuration files is corrupt or invalid, logins might fail (or succeed when they shouldn’t).
  • Authconfig is a tool that provides higher-level management of the PAM configuration. It is a script that sets up PAM as directed by the user/sysadmin.
  • Authselect is a replacement for Authconfig. Authselect adds the concept of “profiles” (with optional features that may be enabled or disabled as desired). Authselect should cover most use-cases and it makes manually editing PAM’s low-level configuration files unnecessary.

Authselect became the default in Fedora Linux 28 and later became mandatory in Fedora Linux 36.

Fedora Linux 40, the sssd profile, and the local profile

Now that the fundamentals of PAM, Authconfig, and Authselect have been covered, it is time to compare and contrast the Authselect profiles — the sssd profile versus the new local profile.

First, let’s see what SSSD is. Here is an excerpted from SSSD’s website:

SSSD is an acronym for System Security Services Daemon. It is the client component of centralized identity management solutions such as FreeIPA, 389 Directory Server, Microsoft Active Directory, OpenLDAP, and other directory servers. The client serves and caches the information stored in the remote directory server and provides identity, authentication, and authorization services to the host machine.

To simplify, you might think of SSSD as a system for accessing an organization’s server which holds the user data (passphrases, full names, etc.). Normally, you would only be able to login and access the data from user accounts that are present on your local machine (normally stored in the /etc/passwd file). With SSSD, you can access remote user accounts that are stored on a remote server such as Active Directory or 389 Directory Server.

But why is the sssd profile relevant?

Up to Fedora Linux 39, the default Authselect profile was sssd:

$ authselect current
Profile ID: sssd
Enabled features:
- with-silent-lastlog
- with-mdns4
- with-fingerprint

However, as part of Changes/SSSDRemoveFilesProvider for Fedora Linux 40, the way the sssd profile handles local users has changed:

• New “local” profile to handle local users without SSSD will be introduced. This profile will be based on “minimal”, but it may gain more features.

• “minimal” profile will be removed and replaced by “local”.

• “Local” profile will be now the default profile

• ‘sssd’ profile will lose with‐files‐domain and with‐files‐access‐provider options, and will gain ‐‐with‐tlog option.

So, the upgraded local profile replaces the previous minimal profile and local becomes the default Authselect profile for new installs (instead of sssd).

Below is what Authselect shows on a fresh Fedora Linux 40 installation (or from a Live CD session):

$ authselect current
Profile ID: local
Enabled features:
- with-silent-lastlog
- with-mdns4

Migration

The new local profile should be sufficient for those whom only need local user accounts. If you’ve upgraded to Fedora Linux 40 from an earlier release, you will not be switched to the new local profile automatically. You might want to manually switch your system to use the local profile if you do not need the remote account abilities that the sssd profile provides.

The list of features available for the local profile is:

$ authselect list-features local
with-ecryptfs
with-faillock
with-fingerprint
with-libvirt
with-mdns4
with-mdns6
with-mkhomedir
with-pam-gnome-keyring
with-pam-u2f
with-pam-u2f-2fa
with-pamaccess
with-pwhistory
with-silent-lastlog
with-systemd-homed
without-nullok
without-pam-u2f-nouserok

A description of the profile and each of its features can be seen with authselect show local.

To migrate between profiles, use the authselect select <profile> [feature] [feature...] command.

To migrate to the local profile with the with-silent-lastlog and with-mdns4 features enabled:

# authselect select local with-silent-lastlog with-mdns4 

If, for example, you want to add support for fingerprint readers, add that feature name to the list on the command line:

# authselect select local with-silent-lastlog with-mdns4 with-fingerprint

Conclusion

Fedora took the safe route of applying this change only to new Fedora Linux installations. Existing users who upgrade their systems do not need to worry that their PAM authentication stacks will be changed. However, end users may benefit from manually switching to the new local profile on their local-only PCs.

Failed to download metadata for repo ‘fedora-cisco-openh264’: GPG verification is enabled, but GPG signature is not available

Posted by Huiren Woo on 2024-07-11 18:21:51 UTC
I encountered this error recently while trying to install the openh264 on Fedora 39. I did so using the following commands. sudo dnf config-manager --set-enabled fedora-cisco-openh264sudo dnf install gstreamer1-plugin-openh264 mozilla-openh264 This was the full error output I’ve gotten when I…

Using the ATEN CV211 (all-in-one KVM adapter) with Fedora Linux

Posted by Andreas Haerter on 2024-05-16 17:32:00 UTC

The ATEN CV211 is an all-in-one KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse) adapter that turns your laptop into a KVM console, combining the functionality of a wormhole switch, capture box, external DVD-ROM, keyboard, mouse, and monitor, all in one compact and convenient unit. I really like the hardware in daily operations, especially when I have to a takeover new environments with “historically grown” cabling. It is nice to have the ability to get the screen and keyboard control of a yet unknown server without hassle—all with a small USB adapter in your backpack:

ATEN CV211 KVM switch: photo of the hardware

If you connect the adapter, you’ll get a 10 MiB drive mounted with the following contents, containing a Microsoft Windows Client WinClient.exe (basically a Runtime Environment and wrapper) and the real application JavaClient.jar:

$ ll
total 9,1M
drwxr-xr-x. 2 user user  16K  1. Jan 1970  .
drwxr-x---+ 3 root root   60 30. Apr 19:08 ..
-rw-r--r--. 1 user user 3,7M 30. Dez 2019  JavaClient.jar
-rw-r--r--. 1 user user 2,0M 30. Dez 2019  Vplayer.jar
-rwxr-xr-x. 1 user user 3,5M 30. Dez 2019  WinClient.exe

The “login failed” problem

The JavaClient.jar KVM console is mostly the same as ATEN uses for all their IP KVM stuff. They just bind the service to some high port on localhost and use the hardcoded credentials -u administrator -p password to connect (which is obvious in several places):

ATEN CV211 KVM switch: credentials

Sadly, the Java application is not able to run out-of-the-box on a Fedora 40 Linux with OpenJDK / Java SE. The application will start but sometimes does not even list the device. And if there is a device to connect to, the login will fail:

ATEN CV211 KVM switch: login failed with OpenJDK

The JavaClient.jar will not be able to connect with any supported OpenJDK or Azul Zulu Java RE:

# incompatible Java version :-(
$ java -version
openjdk version "17.0.9" 2023-10-17

Solution: Oracle JDK 7

For anybody having the same problem, the following should help:

  1. Use a copy of the Oracle JDK 7 (the patch level does not matter) and the application will work without flaws.1
  2. Make sure the current working directory is the USB mount point so the .jar files are in ./.

For example, if you just extract jdk-7u80-linux-x64.tar.gz to /tmp, you can use the application as follows:

tar -xvf jdk-7u80-linux-x64.tar.gz -C /tmp
cd /run/media/user/disk # or wherever the ATEN CV211 storage was mounted
sudo /tmp/jdk1.7.0_80/bin/java -jar ./JavaClient.jar
ATEN CV211 KVM switch: screenshot of the working application

You can download the Oracle JDK 7 from https://www.oracle.com/de/java/technologies/javase/javase7-archive-downloads.html, but keep in mind to check the license conditions, especially if you are operating in a commercial environment.

If the problem persists…

Sometimes, the “login failed” error occurs even when following the procedure described above (i.e., when using Oracle Java and the current working directory is the mount point). I have not yet been able to determine the exact cause of these (rare) cases. However, this behavior has never occurred during operation but only during the first use. In such cases, a reboot of the hardware by unplugging and reconnecting it to the USB port always helped.


  1. Do not use this old, unpatched Java RE for anything else because of known security vulnerabilities. ↩︎

server updates/reboots

Posted by Fedora Infrastructure Status on 2024-07-10 21:00:00 UTC

We will be applying various updates and rebooting servers. During the outage window various services may be down for short periods of time.

Additionally, we will be upgrading builders to Fedora 40. This will mean that koji buildroot repodata will change to being zstd based (per fedora 40 createrepo_c defaults …